Statistics on dating to meeting a spouse

There's a reason a mutual friend is a trustworthy connector.After all, he or she is hanging out with both of you already.As anyone who's ever been on a blind date knows, you're much more relaxed when you're not psyching yourself up for what's to come.

Being friends first also means you avoid the most obvious pitfall of online dating: not knowing what you're getting."These data suggest that the Internet may be altering the dynamics and outcomes of marriage itself," said Cacioppo."It is possible that individuals who met their spouse online may be different in personality, motivation to form a long-term marital relationship, or some other factor." But not all experts believe that online dating translates into instant bliss.Great news for the dating app averse: Despite what the Tinder-loving media might have you believe, new data suggest that the most common way to meet someone is in real life — namely, through friends.According to a 2,373-person survey conducted by in March using Google Consumer Surveys, more 18- to 34-year-olds met their current significant others through mutual friends than through any other means, including dating apps — close to 39% of respondents said they met "through friends in common," closely followed by 22% who said they met "out in a social setting."Moreover, when it comes to turning initial connections into romantic relationships, friendships still yield the best results — 40% of respondents said they were "platonic friends first" before getting romantic, versus 35% who started as a series of formal dates and 24% who got started from a online dating as a great way to meet people, according to the Pew Research Center, the reality is that the old-fashioned approach reigns supreme: Just 10% of respondents said they met through a dating site or app.